č'i·ńakw'
Special Spirit Power, War Spirit Power, Thunder Power and Chain Ligtning was unique to the Dungeness people. The S'Klallams would display this power in the manner that they entered a village for a potlatch or gathering.



From the Dance Plaza House Post Carvings - Dale Faulstich, Lead Carver and Designer.
Assistant Carvers: Nathan Gillis and  Ed Charles.  Volunteer carvers:  Harry Burlingone and Don Walsh.


Jamestown
S'Klallam Tribe

1033 Old Blyn Hwy
Sequim, WA 98382
360-683-1109
info@jamestowntribe.org
Menu
 
 Home    Announcements  

 
Tribal Events

 
 



July 28, 2008

Jamestown Canoe Journey Blog 



Jamestown coming into
Cowichan


Canoe in regalia


 

On Sunday night, some of us stayed in camp while others went to Tsartlip for dinner and a skipper’s meeting. The meeting, which was to have begun at 7:30, didn’t start until 9, so they returned to camp after 10 and let us know that we didn’t have to be at the Tsartlip beach until 8:30.

On July 28, we got up, had a hot breakfast and broke down camp. While we were working, we were honored by Phil Red Eagle, the man who makes the copper ring necklaces and does the Canoe Ceremony. I had heard about the copper rings, and knew that those who had paddled for Jamestown for the past several years hoped to get theirs. But Phil is the only person who makes them, and the only one who does the ceremony. The ring hangs from a black leather-like cord threaded with a bead, color-coded for each year of the Tribal Canoe Journey. Phil asked all of us to gather around, and he showed us how to loop the necklace around the ring and thread the beads. Then he explained the Canoe Rules, the most important of which is Rule #2.

Here are the rules:

1. EVERY STROKE WE TAKE IS ONE LESS WE HAVE TO MAKE
Keep going! Even against the most relentless wind or retrograde tide, somehow a canoe moves forward. This mystery can only be explained by the fact that each pull forward is a real movement and not a delusion.

 

2. THERE IS TO BE NO ABUSE OF SELF OR OTHERS
Respect and trust cannot exist in anger. It has to be thrown overboard, so the sea can cleanse it. It has to be washed off the hands and cast into the air, so the stars can take care of it. We always look back at the shallows we pulled through, amazed at how powerful we thought those dangers were.

 

3. BE FLEXIBLE
The adaptable animal survives. If you get tired, ship your paddle and rest. If you get hungry, put in on the beach and eat a few oysters. If you can’t figure one way to make it, do something new. When the wind confronts you, sometimes you’re supposed to go the other way.

 

4. THE GIFT OF EACH ENRICHES ALL
Every story is important. The bow, the stern, the skipper, the power puller in the middle – everyone is part of the movement. The elder sits in her cedar at the front, singing her paddle song, praying for us all. The weary paddler resting is still ballast. And there is always that time when the crew needs some joke, some remark, some silence to keep going, and the least likely person provides.

 

5. WE ALL PULL AND SUPPORT EACH OTHER
Nothing occurs in isolation. When we aren’t in the family of a canoe, we are not ready for whatever comes. The family can argue, mock, ignore each other at its worst, but that family will never let itself sink. A canoe that lets itself sink is certainly wiser never to leave the beach. When we know that we are not alone in our actions, we also know we are lifted up by everyone else.

 

6. A HUNGRY PERSON HAS NO CHARITY
Always nourish yourself. The bitter person, thinking that sacrifice means self-destruction, shares mostly anger. A paddler who doesn’t eat at the feasts doesn’t have enough strength to paddle in the morning. Take that sandwich they throw at you at 2.00 A.M.! The gift of who you are only enters the world when you are strong enough to own it.

 

7. EXPERIENCES ARE NOT ENHANCED THROUGH CRITICISM
Who we are, how we are, what we do, why we continue, flourish with tolerance. The canoe fellows who are grim go one way. The men and women who find the lightest flow may sometimes go slow, but when they arrive they can still sing. And they have gone all over the sea, into the air with the seagulls, under the curve of the wave with the dolphin and down to the whispering shells, under the continental shelf. Withdrawing the blame acknowledges how wonderful a part if it all every one of us really is.

 

8. THE JOURNEY IS WHAT WE ENJOY
Although the start is exciting and the conclusion gratefully achieved, it is the long, steady process we remember. Being part of the journey requires great preparation; being done with a journey requires great awareness; being on the journey, we are much more than ourselves. We are part of the movement of life. We have a destination, and for once our will is pure, our goal is to go on.

 

9. A GOOD TEACHER ALLOWS THE STUDENT TO LEARN
We can berate each other, try to force each other to understand, or we can allow each paddler to gain awareness through the ongoing journey. Nothing sustains us like that sense of potential that we can deal with things. Each paddler learns to deal with the person in front, the person behind, the water, the air, the energy; the blessing of the eagle.

 

10. WHEN GIVEN ANY CHOICE AT ALL, BE A WORKER BEE – MAKE HONEY!

The Ten Rules of the Canoe were developed by the Quileute Canoe contingent for a Northwest Experimental Education Conference in 1990.  SOURCE: David Neel, THE GREAT CANOES: Reviving a Northwest Coast Tradition, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver, 1991:133-4. Graphic after EDWARD S. CURTIS IN THE LAND OF THE WAR CANOES: A Pioneer Cinematographer in the Pacific Northwest, by Bill Holm and George Irving Quimby, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver 1980:56. 

Since we received our rings, we all realize that they are a symbol of respect – everyone knows that we have been on a journey and we have made an oath to try to live by the ten Canoe Rules. Those with more beads have been on more journeys. The journey does not end when we return home.

Because we were camped at Tsawout but taking off from Tsartlip, we took two vehicles piled with people (all of the pullers plus the three support boat crew plus two drivers) there, dropping the boat people at the marina and the pullers at the beach. By the time we returned to camp, it was completely packed, and we left for Cowichan.

Meanwhile, the pullers were having a great day, sailing along. The canoes had been divided into 4 groups – the north, south, east and west. We were part of the South (Puget Sound) group, and under sail, Jamestown was getting ahead of the group and heard others yelling “Slow down, Jamestown!” They reported that as they sailed alongside the Suquamish support boat (a large sailboat), they chatted and put their feet up. The skipper of the sailboat told them they were traveling 4.5 knots under sail. All of the canoes landed at Cherry Point, a bit south of the Wes Can Terminal, where the final landing would take place.

Ground crew set up camp in a wooded area along the Cowichan River, in Duncan, B.C. The Cowichan Tribe has arranged for buses to take us everywhere, and golf carts shuttle us around the camp and fields full of vendors and where the protocol will take place. We grab folding chairs, hop on a bus to the terminal, and find a place along the water. This is a large sea freight terminal at the end of a long spit, with a long walkway for vendors and spectators. The public address system is high-tech, and can be heard by those on land and those on the water. Cowichan Chief Lydia Hwitsun welcomed us, and after the first canoe landed, filled with the carvers of the Spirit Pole (a part of the Spirit of British Columbia 150, a celebration of the 150th anniversary of the Province, part of which is a celebration of aboriginal peoples) which had been carved over the past 95 days as it traveled through Salish territory - called for the Northern Relatives to canoe in. They made a large circle, each pulling along shore in their regalia – cedar shirts, masks, flags – and formed a raft before coming ashore. When the South group was invited in, Jamestown was first, followed by the other Puget Sound Tribes – Cowlitz, Chehalis, Puyallup, Nisqually, Suquamish, Squaxin Island, Port Gamble and Elwha. Then the west (Washington and Vancouver Island coasts) and finally the east (San Juan) route. When all were in, one by one a microphone was passed to each canoe, and the person in the front seat announced the name of their canoe, the name of their Tribe, and where they came from. Pete Holden announced for our Tribe. Each route group was then given permission to come ashore and the paddled to a nearby marine to pull out.  The entire ceremony took 2 hours – apparently record time for landing protocol. But the Cowichan had been very specific about what could and could not be said at landing (in prior years, people told stories and sang and it could take 5-6 hours to get through all of the canoes), and it would have been considered disrespectful to say more. In all, 109 canoes landed at Cowichan! The Chief said “We welcome our thousand relatives.” With 109 canoes, each holding an average of 10 pullers, there were more than a thousand people in the canoes alone, and even more on land. Quite spectacular, and the canoes were beautiful – all different examples of Salish art and carving technique. Irv, our primary photographer, has taken more than 1000 photos so far, and will share them when we return to Sequim (after sorting and editing them).

Ground crew took the bus back to camp, while the pullers got different buses back. Irv had managed to yell our campsite number to the crew while he was taking their pictures at landing, so they had a vague idea how to find us. Dinner was served in the gym.

By 10:30, we all went to bed.
 

Blog for:

July 30, 2008

July 29, 2008


July 28, 2008

July 27, 2008

July 26, 2008

July 25, 2008

July 24, 2008

July 23, 2008

July 22, 2008

 

   
Home    |    Top    |    Search    |    Links    |    Contact Us    |    7Cedars Casino

©2008 Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe