Mother of the
Wolf Children

 
The legend of the mother and wolf children describe the origin of the village on Sequim Bay.
She is carved with her digging stick and harvested clams, a delicacy, and important resource for the Tribe throughout history.
 
From the Dance Plaza House Post Carvings - Dale Faulstich, Lead Carver and Designer.
Assistant Carvers: Nathan Gilles and Ed Charles. Volunteer carvers: Harry Burlingone and Don Walsh.

 
Jamestown
S'Klallam Tribe

1033 Old Blyn Hwy
Sequim, WA 98382
360-683-1109
info@jamestowntribe.org
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Jamestown S'Klallam History
Coastal Salish Canoes
Coastal Salish Weaving
Dungeness Massacre
Indian Homes
Men's Responsibilities
Women's Responsibilities
Stages of Life
Treaty of 1855
Tamanowas Rock Sanctuary
Tse-Whit-Zen-Villiage
 
 

 

Tse-whit-zen
an Ancient Indian Village in Port Angeles Harbor


 

The State Department of Transportation unearthed Tse-whit-zen in August 2003, while building a dry dock on the Port Angeles, Washington front. After spending about $60 million - and finding 335 intact skeletons - the state abandoned the project. But one of the department's costliest mistakes has turned into an extraordinary find: Working side by side, archaeologists and tribal members have uncovered burials, the remains of many structures, and signs of human activity dating back at least 2,700 years. To learn more about the Tse-whit-zen village click on the following links:
 

View photos of artifacts found at Tse-whit-zen Village.
 
One Tribe's Story of Discovery, Conflict and Heartache, by Frances G. Charles, Tribal Chairperson of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe.
 
 

     

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